Cynthia Baumann Obituary
 
In Memory of

Cynthia Lillian Baumann

October 18, 1925 - March 23, 2014
Obituary

  Cynthia Lillian Baumann (Morley) 1925 - 2014 Cynthia Lillian Baumann (Morley) was born on the 18 th of October, 1925 in the Wandsworth borough of South West London, to Lilian E. Morley (Hawkins) and Clifford W. Morley.  Her circumstances at home led to her spending part of her childhood in the care of her grandmother, Florence Morley and her Aunt, Violet L. Hawkins, whom she grew very close to, and loved dearly.   World War II began during her teenage years, and with England being a primary German target for bombing, she had more than her share of close calls.  She recalled once walking to work...


 



Cynthia Lillian Baumann (Morley)



1925 - 2014



Cynthia Lillian Baumann (Morley) was born on the 18th of October, 1925 in the Wandsworth borough of South West London, to Lilian E. Morley (Hawkins) and Clifford W. Morley.  Her circumstances at home led to her spending part of her childhood in the care of her grandmother, Florence Morley and her Aunt, Violet L. Hawkins, whom she grew very close to, and loved dearly.



 



World War II began during her teenage years, and with England being a primary German target for bombing, she had more than her share of close calls.  She recalled once walking to work (file clerk at Vickers-Armstrongs), and passing the shells of buildings she would walk past every day, destroyed from air raids just hours prior.  This never broke her spirit, or stopped her from pursuing her career and family aspirations -- an outlook that would persist throughout her life.



 



“We did what we had to in order to get through, but you look back on it and you think, ‘Holy Smokes, how did we all make it?'” -Cynthia





In her late teens she went to work for the Red Cross, in Lancashire, in the North West of England.  This soon brought her to the air base in London, where she worked close to the air fields, and had the unique experience of riding in a B17 Bomber, a memory she cherished.  The pilot was an American stationed in England (Philip Smith) who she became engaged to, and would later marry after the war.



 



As World War II began to wind down, she took a job with the Shell Oil Company.  The Vice President of Shell Oil (Christopher Brunner) and his wife had no children at the time, and took her under their wing as if one of their own.  This proved to be a pivotal point in her life, as they provided the means and accommodations for her to emigrate from England to the United States of America.  Post-war resources were at a minimum, so leaving the country was not an option for the average citizen.  However, in February 1946, Shell Oil managed to get her a spot on the Tai Ping Yang, an oil tanker containing just 12 passenger and crew, for a harrowing 13 day trip across the Atlantic to New York City.



 



“Aboard the ship they had all sorts of food that I had not seen in years, [because we had been living on war rations] but I was too seasick to eat any of it, so it was soda water and crackers for me.  Oh, I was scared to death!” -Cynthia



 



Cynthia, who was just barely 20 years old, had never visited the United States prior, but dove head-first into her new life, without looking back.  The tug boats were on strike during her arrival, so the Navy send out a small boat to bring them to the dock.  As a result, she bypassed being processed through Ellis Island.



 



Shell Oil representatives met her in New York and showed her around the city, before putting her on a train to San Francisco, where she stayed for two days before arriving at her final destination in Los Angeles, CA.



 



Upon her arrival in LA, she married Phillip Smith, who was then a reporter for the Daily News in Los Angeles, CA.  Philip had personal issues that put a strain on the marriage, and they were divorced after a year, in 1947.



 



After their marriage ended she made her own way in the city.  She had been trained at Shell Oil as a Comptometer operator (one of the earliest calculating machines) and was very proficient at it, so she had no trouble quickly gaining work.



 



In 1949 she married Oscar Vogel Jr. and moved to Glendale, CA where in 1950 she gave birth to their son, Christopher Louis Vogel.  Christopher was named after Christopher Brunner, the man from Shell Oil who helped her get to the United States, who was also named Godfather of Christopher Vogel.  They divorced in 1953.



In 1954 she married Robert Otto Baumann in Carson City, NV.  They moved to North Las Vegas, NV in 1955 and she gave birth to David Robert Baumann in 1956.  She worked at Garrett Freightline and later at Vegas Village.  She proved to be an asset in the community.  She served on the PTA board of Lincoln Elementary in 1964-65 and was always involved with events going on.  



In 1976 she became the first woman to serve on the North Las Vegas City Council and the Las Vegas Convention and Visitors Authority in 1977.  Her tenure ended in 1979. 



She was a devoted wife to Robert for 60 years.  Her first son, Christopher married and gave her two grandsons, Anthony (Tony) 1975 and Robert (Rob) 1980.  Christopher preceded her in death in 1983.   Her second son, David and wife, Cindy married in 1975 and that became another milestone as she shared the same name, Cynthia L. Baumann.   They gave her two Granddaughters, Leslea 1978 and Stephanie 1982.  She was blessed with 3 Great Grandchildren, Chloe, Jaden and Kenna whom she was always thrilled to see when they visited. 



She was very passionate about all she did from politics to taking the grandchildren to the mall to enjoy the carousel and visit the Woolworth Store to purchase school supplies.  If she wasn’t preparing for a family holiday meal, she was busy showing the grandkids how to feed the chicken, Henny Penny, playing memory and there was never a dull moment at the dinner table when you would get the classic fork poke for placing your elbows on the table.



 She had very strong traditions and never missed a birthday or anniversary or any special day for family and friends.



She will be missed greatly and always remembered by her ability to make things happen. 



Service will be held at Veteran’s Memorial Cemetery in Boulder City, NV



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