Douglas Bolling Obituary
Douglas Bolling photos Douglas Bolling photos

There are 63 photos in the gallery

Service Information

 
In Memory of

Douglas Bolling

May 1, 1942 - February 12, 2013
Obituary
Biography

Douglas Bolling was born May 1, 1942 (it was a very good year), in Greenville, Alabama, the sixth of eight children of Luther Bolling and Elmira Watson Bolling, both deceased. And according to his mother his full name is Douglas MacArthur Bolling which he vehemently denied since it was not on his birth certificate. Though born in Alabama, Doug was raised in Chicago, Illinois, attended public schools, graduated from Roosevelt University, and completed courses toward a master’s degree at Northwestern University. Like a number of young black men in Chicago, Doug started his work life with the U.S. Postal Service, moved on to the Chicago Transit Authority, and from there to the Chicago Police Department (CPD) in September, 1965. Doug served as a patrol officer and detective with gang intelligence. When Doug took the CPD sergeant’s examination, he was #2 on the list and was Number one on a subsequent lieutenant’s list. Doug also served as the Administrative Assistant to First Deputy Charles Ford, and commander of the 11th police district. While commander in the 11th District, Doug implemented several new programs to enhance the quality of life of the residents. He offered free tax services for residents who wanted it. Additionally, Doug worked with several city departments, residents, local politicians, corporate neighbors, financial institutions, neighborhood housing services, community organizations, and De Paul University to implement his vision of the City’s first...
Douglas Bolling was born May 1, 1942 (it was a very good year), in Greenville, Alabama, the sixth of eight children of Luther Bolling and Elmira Watson Bolling, both deceased. And according to his mother his full name is Douglas MacArthur Bolling which he vehemently denied since it was not on his birth certificate. Though born in Alabama, Doug was raised in Chicago, Illinois, attended public schools, graduated from Roosevelt University, and completed courses toward a master’s degree at Northwestern University. Like a number of young black men in Chicago, Doug started his work life with the U.S. Postal Service, moved on to the Chicago Transit Authority, and from there to the Chicago Police Department (CPD) in September, 1965. Doug served as a patrol officer and detective with gang intelligence. When Doug took the CPD sergeant’s examination, he was #2 on the list and was Number one on a subsequent lieutenant’s list. Doug also served as the Administrative Assistant to First Deputy Charles Ford, and commander of the 11th police district.
While commander in the 11th District, Doug implemented several new programs to enhance the quality of life of the residents. He offered free tax services for residents who wanted it. Additionally, Doug worked with several city departments, residents, local politicians, corporate neighbors, financial institutions, neighborhood housing services, community organizations, and De Paul University to implement his vision of the City’s first “Super Block” project. Doug’s vision for a “Super Block” demonstrated his on the job creativity coupled with practicality. He made sure that elements such as drug dealers and other problems were solved and as a result residents were able to get financing to improve their property and an entire city block. These grateful residents along with the City of Chicago put in a park in the 800 block of North Harding and named it the Commander Douglas Bolling Park. During his tenure in the 11th District, Doug also implemented an innovative police action called the “reverse sting” which significantly reduced drug trafficking there. The “reverse sting” removed the drug dealers, replaced them with undercover police officers, then targeted and arrested the buyers of the drugs after they had taken possession of the product. All of Doug’s work with the Chicago Police Department and particularly in the 11th District demonstrated his profound respect for the dignity and value of others. Among the many awards Doug received was The Chicago Commission’s Outstanding Law Enforcement Award for Professional Leadership in 1996. He retired from the Chicago Police Department in March 1998 after having served 33 years.
Doug was a loving father who taught his daughter, son, and grandchildren about family and life. His children knew he loved them deeply and wholeheartedly and that he would do anything he could to help them be the best they could be. And while Doug did not participate with any formal religion, he was a spiritual man who lived and advocated for the “Golden Rule”.
Besides family, one of his passions was basketball where he played with a fluid group of friends for almost 50 years. Doug took his son Richard, at age 3, with him to the basketball gym. This group of men, their sons, and grandsons continue to gather for basketball and camaraderie. After retiring, Doug started playing golf with old and new friends and along with Bob Mays, Earl Nevels and William Buckner, inaugurated the Saturday morning breakfast club which continues to this day. Fitness, healthy living, and eating well were some of things on the top of his list of priorities. Travel was another passion and he was ready to go at the drop of a reservation. Doug was an avid reader who also loved music particularly Jazz and the Blues.
Doug leaves behind loving and cherished memories with Ella, his wife of 50 years, daughter Myra Smith (Sidney); son Richard W. (Chante); grandsons Charles Douglas Mitchell, and Richard W. Bolling II; granddaughter Taylore Jewel Bolling; brothers Aubrey, and Melvin (Shirley); sister-in-law Diane Arnold (Romy), brother-in–law Daniel James, Jr, and a large number of nieces, nephews, cousins, friends, and colleagues.
Doug was an exceptional man, a man of substance as well as a loving and devoted husband and father. And from Ella “HE WAS MY SUPERMAN AND NOW SUPER MAN HAS LEFT THE BUILDING”.

“I had a lifelong quarrel with God, but we made up in the end”


Funeral Blues by W.H. Auden
Stop all the clocks, cut off the telephone,
Prevent the dog from barking with a juicy bone,
Silence the pianos and with muffled drum
Bring out the coffin, let the mourners come.

Let airplanes circle moaning overhead
Scribbling on the sky the message He is dead,
Put crepe bows round the white necks of the public doves,
Let the traffic policemen wear black cotton gloves.

He was my North, My South, My East and West,
My working week and my Sunday rest,
My noon, my midnight, my talk, my song;
I thought that love would last forever: I was wrong.

The stars are not wanted now: put out ever one;
Pack up the moon and dismantle the sun;
Pour away the ocean and sweep up the wood;
For nothing now can ever come to any good.

Share your memories or express your condolences by signing the Guest Book below or click here for entry suggestions.

"This will never be something I just accept emotionally. I miss you so much Dad."

Submit Guest Book Entry
This Guest Book has 28 entries. View Complete Guest Book

More Obituaries

Las Vegas Review-Journal
DOUGLAS BOLLING Douglas Bolling, 70, of Las Vegas, a retired 33-year veteran of the Chicago Police Department and police commander, passed away...

Read obituary at Las Vegas Review-Journal.

Personalize Your Tribute

Share photos, videos and more with Legacy Memorial Websites. Find out more.

 

Dignity Memorial Personal Planning Guide

Start Planning Today
Record your choices for your final arrangements along with essential estate and personal information.

Audio Condolences

Use your phone to dial in a free personalized message. Click here to make an entry or listen to recordings from friends and family.