Shirley Malone Obituary
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In Memory of

Shirley Boie Malone

January 12, 1928 - February 13, 2012
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Shirley Davis was born January 12, 1928 to Vernie and Campbell Davis of St. Joseph, Missouri. She was the youngest of four surviving children and 11 years younger than her next oldest sister, Madge. Her brother Rex was 18 years old at the time. She had two other sisters, Lois and Ruth. After four daughters, including Jackie, who died as an infant, Vernie and Campbell were expecting Shirley to be a boy. Of course she wasn't, but she was given the middle name of Boie, a little while after birth, so it was never put on her birth certificate. Growing up in the Great Depression was not easy. Shirley's dad had eye problems and could not always work. As a little girl Shirley had recurrent ear infections and had to drop out of 1st grade and couldn't return to school until the following year. At age 12 she needed to get her tonsils out and because her family couldn't afford the surgery, her sister Madge used the money she had saved from working to pay for it. In 1945, Shirley spent the summer with her brother Rex and his wife Ramona in Burbank, California. She got a job in a dress shop on San Fernando Road. Her brother encouraged her to stay for her senior year of high school because at that time UCLA was free for residents, but Shirley was homesick and went back to Missouri. In 1946, Shirley graduated from Central High School in St. Jo and went to junior college with hopes of being a researcher in a lab. But hanging with her friends was more enticing to her than studying and...
Shirley Davis was born January 12, 1928 to Vernie and Campbell Davis of St. Joseph, Missouri. She was the youngest of four surviving children and 11 years younger than her next oldest sister, Madge. Her brother Rex was 18 years old at the time. She had two other sisters, Lois and Ruth.
After four daughters, including Jackie, who died as an infant, Vernie and Campbell were expecting Shirley to be a boy. Of course she wasn't, but she was given the middle name of Boie, a little while after birth, so it was never put on her birth certificate.
Growing up in the Great Depression was not easy. Shirley's dad had eye problems and could not always work.
As a little girl Shirley had recurrent ear infections and had to drop out of 1st grade and couldn't return to school until the following year. At age 12 she needed to get her tonsils out and because her family couldn't afford the surgery, her sister Madge used the money she had saved from working to pay for it.
In 1945, Shirley spent the summer with her brother Rex and his wife Ramona in Burbank, California. She got a job in a dress shop on San Fernando Road. Her brother encouraged her to stay for her senior year of high school because at that time UCLA was free for residents, but Shirley was homesick and went back to Missouri.
In 1946, Shirley graduated from Central High School in St. Jo and went to junior college with hopes of being a researcher in a lab. But hanging with her friends was more enticing to her than studying and she soon dropped out. She worked at the town's paper the News-Press where she helped with ad layout.
Single and looking for adventure, Shirley decided to move with a friend to New York State, where she got a job with IBM in Binghamton. While there she saw a huge contraption for duplicating documents which was a prototype for a copy machine.
IBM sponsored a speaker series for it's employees and Shirley was able to see many of the day's most celebrated people. She heard Werner Von Braun tell about how people would soon be rocketing into outer space and she could hardly believe it. Once she went to see Eleanor Roosevelt speak, but was running late. She ran in the door, practically right into Mrs. Roosevelt, who very nicely said to her, "Well, hello."
After living in New York for a while, a friend asked if she would like to move to Denver and Shirley said yes. The two, rented rooms at a house on Holly Street with a couple of stewardesses. Women were always moving in and out of the house as they would get married or leave town. Shirley met some of her life-long friends when they moved into that house.
Shirley got a job as a typist at Lowry Air Force Base. In 1955, when President Dwight D. Eisenhower spent two months in Denver's Fitzsimmons Army Hospital for heart problems, Shirley was assigned to work for his speech writer and typed the first draft of Ike's 1956 State of the Union Address. She also apparently had to fend off advances of the speech writer.
During this time, Shirley got engaged, but the relationship ended when he borrowed her car, left it in the mountain town of Idaho Springs and sent her a letter telling her where she could pick it up. It was for the best, since the ring he gave her turned out to be fake.
Christmas of 1959 Shirley went home to see her family in Missouri and a big storm caused delays with the trains. In the Denver train station she met Paul Malone, a young man who was traveling to see his family in Waverly, Nebraska. The two had a cup of coffee and went their separate ways. Little did Shirley know, Paul had gotten her phone number off her luggage tag. When he called her later, she didn't remember who he was at first.
Paul and Shirley started dating and got married just four months later on May 6th, 1960. They had a simple ceremony at a minister's home with two close friends as witnesses. They honeymooned at the Broadmoor Hotel in Colorado Springs.
Paul had been stationed in Denver with the Air National Guard and got a job at Martin-Marietta. He decided he would like to go to college and was accepted to Colorado State University. Paul and Shirley moved to Ft. Collins where he went to school and she got a job with the U.S. Forrest Service.
After three years and one surgery, Shirley got pregnant. Melissa Jane Malone was born August 22, 1963. Since Paul was still in school, Shirley needed to go back to work and so Melissa was put into daycare at just five weeks old. The first day back at work Shirley just sat at her desk and cried.
After graduating, Paul got a job with the U.S. Soil Conservation Service in Burlington, Colorado. The family moved and Shirley became a stay-at-home mom. While there she gave birth to Jennifer Ree Malone.
Paul was transferred for a brief time to Grand Junction, Colorado and then the family settled in Rifle. Then they picked up again and moved to Rocky Ford.
In 1974, Paul was transferred again and the Malones packed up the car and moved to Lynden, Washington. On the trip there they stopped at Yellowstone National Park and the Spokane World's Fair.
In Washington Shirley and Paul divorced and in 1975 she moved with Missy and Jenny back to Denver. Shirley had family living in Denver, including her sister Madge, her brother-in-law Francis and nieces Ruth, Pam and Mary.
Shirley soon got a job with the IRS and she and her daughters moved into an apartment in Lakewood. She was always working hard to get ahead and was constantly applying for better jobs in the government. She took classes at Red Rocks Community College in shorthand, accounting and law.
Eventually Shirley got a job working for the Department of Energy, but she was laid off when President Reagan deregulated the gasoline market. She took a job with the Minerals Management Service, which was at the Federal Center, close to her home in Lakewood. She continued to work there, receiving many promotions and awards, until her retirement in 1995.
In 1978 she purchased a two-bedroom townhouse in Lakewood, where she lived for 24 years until she moved to California in 2002, to be closer to her daughters and grandchildren.
Shirley was an animal lover and had three very special pets in her life. Snoopy, a Beagle, was adopted into the family when they lived in Rifle, but was given away before the move to Washington. Skimless was a neighborhood cat whose owners had moved away and soon became part of the family. She was a beloved pet, until she passed away in 1987. And Bucky, a chocolate cocker spaniel, was Shirley's baby. He was adopted as a puppy and was Shirley's constant companion and he even made the move to California with her. He passed away in 2005.
Shirley was a world traveler and visited England, France, Austria, and Italy. In 2000, she and her daughter, Melissa, spent 30 memorable days on a ship from Greece to Singapore. On the way she rode a camel in the Sinai Desert, walked inside King Tut's tomb and rode a chair carried by 4 men up 150 steps to a Hindu temple in India. She saw Job's tomb in Oman, visited Thailand and Malaysia and drank Singapore Slings in Singapore. When all was said and done they had gone completely around the world.
After moving to California, Shirley was diagnosed with Parkinson's Disease. Although she had many health problems before, including three types of cancer and numerous surgeries, this would be the one problem that even Shirley's determination couldn't defeat. Soon it became obvious that it was more than just Parkinson's causing Shirley problems. She became more and more confused and eventually hospitalized, with what was eventually diagnosed as Lewy Body Dementia.
Shirley moved into an assisted living community and with the help of medication, was able to enjoy time with her family, especially her three grandchildren, Andy, Gracie and Finnegan. Her disease progressed slowly over the next five years.
On January 13, 2012, Shirley passed away peacefully .

"Dear Melissa and Jen, Love to you and your families. Your mom was great. She was always kind to me and fun to talk to. Im sure it was difficult for you in..." Brian Leslie (Tampa, FL)

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More Obituaries

Denver Post
Malone, Shirley B. (Davis), 84, passed away on February 13, 2012. Born in St. Joseph, MO, she was a longtime Lakewood resident. She retired from...

Read obituary at Denver Post.

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