Siu Ying Wong Obituary
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In Memory of

Dr. Siu Ying Wong

December 9, 1945 - April 25, 2014
Obituary

Dr. Siu Ying Wong, O.M.D., L.Ac., D.N.B.A.O. (1945-2014) Siu Ying Wong, was born in Brunei in December 1945 to Wong, Kok On and Liong, Ah Fun. She was the eldest of four siblings, and is survived by her sister Wong, Lai Geng, and her brother David Wong. Her brother, Wong, Yeun Ying, predeceased her. Furthermore, she is also survived by her daughter, Millie Bun and son-in-law, Dustin Jones. Dr. Wong graduated from the Chinese Medicine Institute. Her practice of acupuncture and herbology brought Dr. Siu Ying Wong, and her husband Dr. Jowell Bun from Hong Kong to the United States. In 1973, she treated Congressman Frank Annunzio in...
Dr. Siu Ying Wong, O.M.D., L.Ac., D.N.B.A.O.
(1945-2014)

Siu Ying Wong, was born in Brunei in December 1945 to Wong, Kok On and Liong, Ah Fun. She was the eldest of four siblings, and is survived by her sister Wong, Lai Geng, and her brother David Wong. Her brother, Wong, Yeun Ying, predeceased her. Furthermore, she is also survived by her daughter, Millie Bun and son-in-law, Dustin Jones.

Dr. Wong graduated from the Chinese Medicine Institute. Her practice of acupuncture and herbology brought Dr. Siu Ying Wong, and her husband Dr. Jowell Bun from Hong Kong to the United States. In 1973, she treated Congressman Frank Annunzio in Washington, D.C. He expressed deep appreciation for the treatment, and bestowed a congressional award upon her. She continued building and establishing her practice in Las Vegas, Nevada, the San Francisco Bay Area, and eventually established her practice in Sacramento, CA. Dr. Wong was the first woman licensed as an acupuncturist in the State of Nevada.

While establishing her practice of acupuncture and herbology in the United States, Dr. Wong, worked concurrently in other fields, including work as a chef in Chinese restaurants. Many of her family, friends and patients may have seen her love of food, and use of herbs and spices come through in their conversations and exchange of recipes.

Dr. Wong thoroughly enjoyed spending time with friends and family. She took joy in the preparation of dishes for the gatherings as much as she enjoyed attending the gatherings. Trying new restaurants and new foods were as exciting as introducing new foods to her family and friends. This became apparent as she travelled around the world, making sure to try the local cuisine. She enjoyed attending farmers' markets, and could be seen shopping at the Sunday 'W' Street Farmers' Market under the freeway. Her knowledge of Chinese healing soups with herbs is unforgettable.

Dr. Wong loved life, and loved to laugh with her family and friends. She loved to travel and discover the world. As a young woman, she took in the sights and tastes of Europe with her husband. As she settled into the United States, she discovered both the east coast and the west coast. In 2004, she visited China, climbing the Great Wall of China for the first time at age 59. The highlight of her 2004 trip to China was her refuge to Pu Tuo Shan, one of the four sacred Chinese Buddhist Mountains. Pu Tuo Shan is dedicated to Guan Yin Bodhisattva. This was so exciting for her, she jumped on the chance to return to China in 2005, and hiked parts of Jiu Hua Shan, another sacred Chinese Buddhist Mountain, and paid respect at numerous temples and shrines on and in that mountainous terrain. Jui Hua Shan is famous for its rich landscape and ancient temples. Many of the mountain's shrines and temples are dedicated to Dì Zhàng Wang pu sa (Earth store Bodhisattva).

Back at home, Dr. Wong enjoyed gardening flowers, fruits and vegetables. Her favorite plants were her geraniums, orchids, peonies and gladiolus. She was excited to start her heirloom tomato plants for the upcoming season. The day prior to her sudden departure, she was giddy about a Japanese squash she was getting ready to add to her garden.

In the office, Dr. Wong had the exceptional skill and compassion necessary to understand and treat her patients, balancing each individual, despite how little or much was expressed to her verbally. She practiced for over half century, and served countless individuals with her mastery of both the scientific technique and the spiritual art of acupuncture yielding remarkable results in her patients.

As you can see, Dr. Wong lived a full life. Although she has left our side too soon, she would not want you to be sad for her. Express your love and joy. Think of the ways Dr. Wong enhanced your life. Most importantly, remember how short life is, and make the most of your life. Do a good deed for someone unexpectedly, and expect nothing back.


Spirit Mantra for Rebirth in the Pure Land:

Na Mo E Mi Dwo Pe Ye
Dwo Two Chye Dwo Ye
Dwo Di Ye Two
E Mi Li Du Pe Pi
E Mi Li Dwo
Syi Dan Pe Pi
E Mi Li Dwo
Pi Jya Lan Di
E Mi Li Dwo
Pi Jya Lan Dwo
Chye Mi Li
Chye Chye Nwo
Jr Dwo Jya Li
Swo Pe He

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"I am very sad to hear of Siu passing so suddenly. I am her neighbor Ed who lives across the street from Siu's and Millie's Victorian house in Alameda...." Ed Byrne (Alameda, CA)

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More Obituaries

Sacramento Bee, The
WONG, Dr. Siu Ying Age 68, passed away on Friday, April 25, 2014 in West Sacramento, CA. She was born on December 9, 1945 in Brunei. Visitation...

Read obituary at Sacramento Bee, The.

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